Mirrored Worlds

Kvilhaug explains that, viewed from a Nordic cosmological angle, femininity represents the unseen forces - the wisdom sought - while masculinity represents the physical forces and the search for wisdom. As such, the principle of masculinity seeks to uncover the principle of femininity - the seeker and the sought, the question and the answer, the illusion and the reality. What I find really intriguing is that there is an inherent mirroring that occurs as the cosmos becomes physical. Until that point, the feminine principle remains unseen while the masculine principle is the physical action that helps bring matter into existence. Once that happens, however, the principles seem to flip.

THEOLOGYMAGICPOLYTHEISM

Kyaza

12/20/20220 min read

As I'm slowly making my way through Maria Kvilhaug's Seed of Yggdrasil, I'm finding all sorts of intriguing cosmological concepts that really speak to me. Even though I've only encountered some of the concepts that intrigue me in her work, I'm inclined to give them more weight simply because her bibliography contains extensive - and I mean extensive - primary sources.

In her research, she found that there are specific formulas that get repeated throughout the Eddas and the sagas, one of which is a trinity formula for both the gods and the goddesses. She also discusses how the masculine and feminine exist in a coequal state, where the masculine powers constantly seek the hidden wisdom held at the center of a sacred enclosure by the feminine powers. This echoes mystery traditions found in other polytheistic religions, including Hellenismos (Greek paganism), Kemeticism (Egyptian paganism), and traditional polytheistic concepts found within Mixteca religions.

The polarity of masculine and feminine powers is found throughout multiple mythologies and also serves as a key tenet of magic. Polarity is not the same as gender, which is integral to understanding the principles of masculinity and femininity from a spiritual-magical angle.

Kvilhaug explains that, viewed from a Nordic cosmological angle, femininity represents the unseen forces - the wisdom sought - while masculinity represents the physical forces and the search for wisdom. As such, the principle of masculinity seeks to uncover the principle of femininity - the seeker and the sought, the question and the answer, the illusion and the reality.

What I find really intriguing is that there is an inherent mirroring that occurs as the cosmos becomes physical. Until that point, the feminine principle remains unseen while the masculine principle is the physical action that helps bring matter into existence. Once that happens, however, the principles seem to flip.

If Sól, Nott, and Jörd are a female trinity, as Kvilhaug suggests, then that is a trinity of the sun, the night, and the earth. The. With Odin, Hoenir, and Loki as a male trinity, then that is a trinity of spirit, thought, and passion.

What immediately struck me when reading this was that each of these trinities act as coequal pairs - the sun and passion, the night and thought, the earth and spirit - which echoes the masculine-feminine pairings found within both Kemetic cosmology and Méxica cosmology.

In addition to that, the maxim "as above so below" struck me as important because the feminine principle, unseen prior to the creation of physical reality, manifests in visible ways in our experience of the physical world - we can physically see the earth, the sun, and nightfall. Simultaneously, the masculine principle, active in the physical creation itself prior to the existence of physical reality, manifests in our experience of the physical world in an invisible way - we cannot see the concepts of spirit, thought, or passion.

Finally, the idea that the masculine principle seeks the feminine principle among the gods also manifests in the way we seek experiences here. Think of how these pair - the sun and passion, the night and thought, the earth and spirit. We seek light to inspire passion, we sometimes drown in our thoughts at night when our minds are the loudest, and we seek spirit through our connection to the earth.

We are always, always searching to unite the masculine and feminine principles within ourselves and within our world. The sun brings life, it inspires passion. The night brings contemplation and the danger of thoughts that threaten sometimes to consume us. The earth reminds us that we are all connected to spirit, all the time. We are mirrors of the gods; this world is their world flipped inside out. This is the heart of the maxim "as above, so below," and it is, while simple, perhaps the hardest concept to fully grasp.